Updated Glossary of Common Ingredient Names
The European Commission has published the Commission Implementing Decision (EU) 2022/677, which updates the Glossary of common ingredient names for use in the labelling of cosmetic products.

GLOSSARY OF COMMON INGREDIENT NAMES

Article 19 of Regulation (EC) No 1223/2009 on cosmetic products lays down the mandatory information that needs to be included in the packaging and container of cosmetic products. (see previous publication) One of the requirements is the inclusion of a list of ingredients, in descending order of concentration.

According to the Cosmetics Regulation, an “ingredient means any substance or mixture intentionally used in the cosmetic product during the process of manufacturing“. Impurities in the raw materials used and subsidiary technical materials used in the mixture (but not present in the final product) are not considered ingredients.

Article 33 to Regulation states that the European Commission shall compile and update a glossary of common ingredient names, taking into account internationally recognized nomenclatures, including the International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients (INCI). The glossary does not constitute a list of the substances authorized for use in cosmetic products.

The terms ‘parfum’ or ‘aroma’ shall be used to identify perfume and aromatic compositions and their raw materials. Some ingredients used in perfume and aromatic compositions do not have an INCI name. In these cases, ‘perfuming names’ are used which have been used in the EU for labelling cosmetics containing those ingredients. Moreover, for colorants (other than colorants intended to color the hair), the CI (Colour Index) nomenclature is to be used. As so, perfuming names and CI nomenclature are included in the glossary of ingredients.

For the purpose of labelling cosmetics, the ingredients are to be expressed using the common ingredient name set out in glossary compiled and updated by the European Commission.

COMMISION IMPLEMENTING DECISION (EU) 2022/677

Taking into account the new ingredient names that are currently in use for cosmetic products marketed in the EU, the Decision (EU) 2019/71, which set out the glossary of common ingredient names (26 491 ingredients in total) , is replaced.

The European Commission has published the Commission Implementing Decision (EU) 2022/677, laying down the rules for the application of Regulation No 1223/2009 as regards the glossary of common ingredient names for use in the labelling of cosmetic products.

The updated on the glossary has included new INCI names as published by the Personal Care Products Council and has corrected existing ingredient names that were erroneously reported or omitted. The updated glossary lists 30 070 ingredients.

The Commission Implementing Decision (EU) 2022/677 applies from 29 April 2023. From 29 April 2022 until 28 April 2023, the economic operators may use the common ingredient names set out in the Annex of this Implementing Decision, for the purpose of compliance with labelling requirements.

Not sure if your cosmetic product labelling is compliant with regulation? Critical Catalyst can help! Feel free to contact us at info@criticalcatalyst.com.

References:

  1. Regulation (EC) No 1223/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 30 November 2009 on cosmetic products.
  2. Commission Decision (EU) 2019/701 establishing a glossary of common ingredient names for use in the labelling of cosmetic products. 2019.
  3. Commission Implementing Decision (EU) 2022/677 laying down rules for the application of Regulation (EC) No 1223/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council as regards the glossary of common ingredient names for use in the labelling of cosmetic products. 2022.

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